Category Archives: Hydraulic fluid purification

Purification of Hydraulic Oils

Purification of Hydraulic Oils

Hydraulic oil is a fairly common product and in many cases it is used in sensitive equipment and technology.  Since recently, filters with a mesh size of 25 to 50 micron have been coming into use in most oil systems.  This was enough to meet purity conditions, for instance, for valves.  But components in hydraulic systems contain narrow passages with low flow rate, which, in the event of oil contamination, can have a significant influence on the entire system as well as its wear.

Types of hydraulic fluid contaminants

Hydraulic fluid may become contaminated as a result of several factors.  First we need to understand the basic difference between primary and secondary pollution.  Primary pollution occurs in the system before commissioning.  Accordingly, secondary pollution is the pollution that occurs directly during equipment operation.  Primary system contamination occurs due to the presence of residues of machining and assembly, as well as the impurities contained in fresh oil.  Secondary contamination is most often caused by machining residues, products of abrasion and corrosion, and dirt, which gets into the system from sealing materials of cylinders or through breather channels in tanks.

Previously, less attention was paid to the dependence between hydraulic equipment service life and the purity of hydraulic oil.  But recent studies have shown that there is a strong relationship between these parameters.  Therefore, hydraulic oil purification should be a mandatory procedure, an important part of measures aimed at extension of service life of machinery and equipment and reduction failure rate.

For example, the all-knowing statistics says that the main causes of premature failure of roller bearings include inadequate lubrication, the presence of particulate matter in oil and overload.

Hydraulic oil purification using filtration method

The general use of filters is the removal of mechanical impurities from hydraulic oils.  The best cleaning results are achieved by installing these devices in several points within the system:

At the tank outlet channel.  This filter is needed to remove the dirt which got into the system with the air;

  • At the pump inlet.  These filters are called filter presses;
  • In the upper part of the tank;
  • In the tank circuit (bypass filter);
  • In the fluid recirculation lines (return filters).

Filter parameters include mesh size and the degree of separation.  For example, if there is a designation β3> 200, it means that you deal with a mesh size of 3 microns, and the degree of separation is 200.  It says that only one particle out of 200 can pass through the filter.

The filtration process efficiency depends on the materials used.  The most common materials are: fiberglass, cellulose paper and metallic mesh.

In general, a hydraulic oil filter consists of a filtering element, pollution indicator and other components.  Filter selection is a strictly individual issue for each system.  Mesh size is usually determined empirically in accordance with the requirements of critical components.  Most frequently, hydraulic systems utilize filters with mesh size from 3 to 40 microns.  It is possible to use devices with a mesh size up to 1 micron, but in this case it is necessary to monitor filter condition, as viscous additives and corrosion inhibitors may lead to clogging of the filter.

GlobeCore offers CMM-type hydraulic oil filtration plants, known for their mobility, cost effectiveness and high quality of product purification.  The required filtration fineness is ensured by repeated passage of oil through a special filter unit.  The equipment is versatile, because it can also work with other types of oil and can be used for oil heating.

Industrial oil purification machine: willing and able!

Transformer oil purification machine include a large group of oil products used for luberiction of friction parts. Industrial oil performance depends on their composition and additives for certain properties of the product.

Industrial oils are usually made of oil fractions boiling at temperautre above 350ºC. They consists of high molecular oil compounds, which are a mix of various hydrocarbon groups and their derivatives.

There are approximately 100 types of industrial oil in existence today. Of these,  46.6% are used in hydraulic systems, and 41% are used in gear and screw drives, as well as in heavy duty industrial components.

Modern industrial oils should comply with certain requirements, such as:

  • increased stability;
  • improved wear resistance, protection and air removal;
  • compatibility with hydraulic system materials;
  • filtration ability;
  • de-emulsification ability.

Industrial oil contamination

In the course of transportation storage and operation, industrial oil accumulate contaminants which degrade the performance of the oils.

The most widely spread contaminant is particulate matter (particles of metal, rubber from gaskets, plastic), formed due to the friction of the lubricated surfaces. With time, the oils accumulate oxidation products, which can take the form of colloids or solved substances.

Foreign substances in the oil changes the oil’s properties, and it ceases to function efficiently. The risk of failures and down time increases significantly.

Removal of contaminants from industrial oil extends service life not only of the oil, but also of the parts lubricated by the oil.

Primary and secondary oil filtration of industrial oil

Filtration refers to removal of suspended particles to protect equipment and extend its service life.

Primary and secondary filtration are used. Primary filtration is used to protect the equipment, and is mostly performed by the manufacturers of the original equipment. This is usually performed by a valve, through which all of the oil flow passes. It should be noted that this only allows to remove larger particles (25 micron or larger). Such filtration is also referred to as coarse filtration, since its purpose is not so much to maintain high purity of the product, but to prevent damage to the lubricated part by the particles. The logic is such: somewhat contaminated oil is better than no oil at all..

The main purpose of secondary filtration is to increase the service life of industrial oil by purifying it. This approach not only improves the oil, but also takes care of the equipment where the oil is used.

GlobeCore’s secondary oil filtration

GlobeCore is one of the leading manufacturers and suppliers of industrial, transformer, turbine and other oil purification equipment.

The CFU secondary filtration units allow to remove particulate matter, such as ash, free and some solved water, water-soluble acids and alikali from the oil. The product is compact and mobile, making it possible to use the equipment directly where the oil product is. One pass through the machine ensures the required degree of purification. Simplicity of design makes it easy in operation.

CMM-1.7CF transformer  oil purification machine

oil purification machine

Practice shows that if the industial oil quality is not controlled, the oil must be changed during each maintenance cycle. In this case, at least 70% of the oil is changed because of contamination, not because it has reached the end of its service life.

GlobeCore’s secondary purification makes this oil reusable. Knowing the amount of used industrial oil, calculating potential economy and profit is simple. Oil purification machine of industrial oil is not only possible, but highly valuable as well!

I-20 Industrial Oil: Filter Prices

I-20 industrial oil is used for the lubrication of the most common industrial assemblies and components that do not require oils with special anti-oxidation or anti-corrosion properties.

Buying the oil is not the only expense.  During operation, the oil’s quality must be monitored and the oil should be purified and regenerated when necessary.  The foremost factor in selecting a purification method is the price to quality ratio.

One of the methods of purification that we would like to discuss today are filters and the specifics of their practical use.

Filters have various designs.  Selection of a filter configuration depends on operating conditions and the requirements to maintain the oil’s purity.  Filters are used practically in all stages of production including the storage and transportation of the oil.  Filters are installed in oil storage facilities, oil refineries and in equipment and machinery using oil.

Transportation, storage, and filling of industrial oil I-20 is performed with equal element filters.  This type of filter is of simple design and can be operated in a wide range of operating pressures.  The main drawback of the equal element filters is the need to disconnect them for filter element cleaning or replacement.

In general, oil filters are cylindrical and vary in design of filter element fixture, the number of filter elements, and presence of safety valves.

The need to change the filter arises when the filter becomes contaminated as indicated by the pressure difference on the filter.  This difference is measured by two manometers.

The design of the filter is chosen depending on where the filter will be installed.  Oil refineries usually filter industrial oil before shipping the oil to the customer or wholesale distributor.

Filters used in storage parks must have high throughput.  Their weight and dimensions do not matter much since the filters are stationary.

Along with fabric filter elements, there are also metal mesh, felt or fiberglass filter elements in the oil industry.

The requirements to filters used for oil in stationary oil storage facilities are similar to those installed in oil refineries.

The main problem with a disposable oil filter is the limited service life.  Filter media becomes saturated with contaminants increasing the pressure drop to maximum limits.

Lube oils are filtered mostly through disk filters that can only assure coarse filtration by removing particles larger than 70 microns.

During filtration of thickened oil, the filter’s throughput may be lowered by as much as 30-40% compared to oil without thickeners.

For operation in low temperatures, filters are equipped with jackets with steam or a water inlet for heating.


See more video about transformer oil purification

Modern Views of Industrial Oil Filtration

What Are the Types of Industrial Oil?

Industrial oils include a great amount of different oil products such as:

•    motor oils (oils for gasoline- or diesel-powered engines);
•    oils for air-engine;
•    transmission oils;
•    hydraulic oils
•    fuel oils (turbine, insulating, compressor oils); and
•    industrial oils.

Depending on the purposes and the application area, each type of oil performs different functions.  In general, insulating fluids are intended to isolate, reject heat and to quench an arc in electrical appliances.  Industrial Oils are used to lubricate working parts of industrial machines, transfer heat from one system to another, reduce the wear and friction rate as well as transfer heat.  Motor Oils serve as the lubricants for piston and rotary internal combustion engines and perform many of the same tasks as industrial oils.

Oil Filtration: Major Motives

The statistics show that about 80% of all oil-filled equipment failures are caused by contamination of industrial oils.  In general, oil is contaminated by such substances as dust, metal chips, rubber crumbs, sand, and other undesireable contaminants.  Particles of less than 2 microns (resin or oxidation products) constitute the greatest danger to the operation of high tech equipment.  Water that got into oil from the atmosphere or by condensation can result in corrosion, rapid wear and accelerated aging of oil. As a result, the operational reliability of machines and their parts are reduced significantly.

To prevent such undesirable consequences, the qualitative performance characteristics of oil should be regularly tested to determine if there are mechanical impurities.  Oil is recommended to be tested both before filling the equipment and during maintenance of the equipment using special devices.  If the performance characteristics turn out to be below the acceptable level, it is recommended to carry out a preventive filtration or what is commonlu referred to as “Oil Processing.”

Oil Filter Classification

Oil filters are divided into different groups according toa very specific classification criteria.  There are built-in and stand-alone filters depending on the place they are mounted.  The built-in filters are mounted into the main part of the oil system and for the most part operate under high pressure.  Accordingly, the stand-alone filters function separately from the oil/lubricating system.
Depending on the application, there are metallic, paper and fiberglass filters.  Metallic Filters work according to the principle of surface filtration.  Usually, they are made of stainless steel that makes it possible to apply them when working with hydraulic and lubricating oils.  The filtration fineness is between 25 and 80 microns.

Paper Filters are used for deep filtration and the filtration fineness is between 10 and 25 microns.
Fiberglass Filters also work according to the principle of deep filtration.  This type of filter distinguishes itself through a high dirt-holding capacity and good filtration fineness even under heavy pressure.

Disposable and non-disposable filters have obtained a wide circulation and popularity in industry. Disposable filters are used so the filtered oil will meet the desired purity class.  When the filter is no longer able to filter oil, it should be replaced with a new one.

The difference between disposable and non-disposable filters is that when non-disposable filters become saturated with contaminants, they are not replaced but cleaned of impurities.  The disadvantage of such an approach is that filters may need frequent cleaning.  It is also worth mentioning that modern filters are not able to remove impurities with the size of between 1 and 5 microns though they constitute about 70% of all possible impurities.  Even so, filters are much in demand at small machine and tractor stations or service stations.  Such methods of cleaning is unprofitable for medium and large industries: the more used oil they have the more expensive the cost of replacing and/or cleaning the filters becomes.

But there exists an optimal and profitable solution!

GlobeCore has developed its CFU line of units to solve the problem of industrial oil filtration.  Such substances as mechanical impurities, carbon black, water-soluble acids, and alkalis are removed from industrial oils by the GlobeCore CFU units.

The following is the list of benefits of using GlobeCore’s filtration and processing equipment:

•    reduces the wear and extends the service life of oil and oil-filled equipment;
•    increases the time necessary between periodic testing;
•    reduces the amount of unscheduled downtime of equipment;
•    increases productivity;
•    preserves oil’s performance characteristics; and
•    reduces the negative impact on the environment.

Being mobile, GlobeCore’s equipment allows for industrial oil processing directly at the remote operating sites.

It is worth mentioning that all benefits listed above contribute to significant cost reductions.


See more video about transformer oil purification

Chemical Treatment and Passivation of Pipes

Steel “Passivation” refers to the process of chemical removal of iron contaminates left of the surface of stainless steel and other steel parts after machining.  Passivation maximizes resistance to corrosion.  A number of different passivation methods exists for various types of steel.

Assembled, welded and closed circuits, such as pipes, in order to be cleaned, must be flushed by circulating liquid through the pipes.  The cleaning process is both chemical and physical.  The minimum flow rate of the solution through the pipes should be at least one (1) meter per second.  Pipeline flow rate and capacity must be considered as well as the diameter of the pipe.

Pipes should be tested for water tightness after installation and connection to the hoses that complete the system.  Special pickling materials should be used to ensure the integrity of the system.

Complete removal of rust is only possible by chemical methods.  Not all of these methods provide for a complete solution and removal of all rusts deposits.  This may be further achieved by the forced, high pressure circulation of special acidic and alkaline solutions that control chemical reactions.

The solution should move through the pipes until the chemical reactions stop. This is the only way to see if the cleaning process is complete.

Special preliminary measures should be performed before treatment, such as, looping the circuits and flow redirection for comprehensive system coverage and providing for a route for air or gas to escape both during and after the process.  Ideally, these issues should be addressed at the time of assembling of the hydraulic system when it is easier and less expensive.

The functions performed by forced circulation, are as follows:

  • in the case of oxidation corrosion – removal of the inhibitor layer;
  • removal of grease from the internal surfaces of the pipelines;
  • removal of corrosion deposits after softening;
  • improvement of metal resistance to corrosion by passivation of pipe internal surfaces.

To determine the approximate time that will be required to complete the work and to choose the required chemicals, it is important to know the actual degree of corrosion in the pipes.  The amount of consumables needed will also depend on the size of the hydraulic system.

It should be noted that the exact amount of chemicals required for cleaning the pipes can only be based on an estimate from past experience with the same or similar hydraulic systems.

To assess the results of the chemical treatment of the pipes, a visual inspection of the most contaminated portions is required.  Not all particles however, will be visible to the naked eye.  This usually concerns small contaminants deposited on the bottom of the pipes.  Such particles are removed by flushing the pipes with oil.  Flow velocity should be at least 20 meters per second. Pipes are ususlly flushed with oil during assembly and during the start-up of oil-filled hydraulic systems.

During the process, the presence of contaminants is controlled by a “granulometric analysis.”  If the flushing does not achieve the desired the results, a more thorough oil filtration of the oil may be required.  Granulometric control also allows the system to make decisions concerning the quality standards of the oil and the hydraulic system’s ability to meet purity requirements.

To avoid the need to purity the oil often, it is best to use reliable equipment, capable of achieving the required results in the minimum time.

These criteria are met by GlobeCore’s CMM system.  This plant performs thermal and vacuum purification of turbine oil, industrial oil, cable oil and other types of oil.  The process removes water, gases and solid particles.  Using the GlobeCore CMM unit can greatly extend the time between chemical cleaning and helps to keep the equipment in top running condition.

See more video about transformer oil purification

Flushing of Hydraulic Systems Found in Industrial Equipment and Mobile Machinery

 

Hydraulic System Contamination

In accordance with widely accepted industrial standards, preventive maintenance processes that remove contaminates from hydraulic systems can produce the following benefits and results:

  1. The effective Service Life of hydraulic motors, pumps, valves and distribution devices can be doubled.
  2. Hydraulic system warranties can be extended by as much as two years due to the reduction in the risk of hydraulic system component failure during the warranty period.  Fluid purity however, must still be monitored and controlled and the hydraulic system must be cleaned annually.
  3. Equipment downtime is reduced.
  4. The cost of transportation of equipment to repair facilities is reduced or eliminated.

Even if oil and hydraulic filters are changed completely, it still does not guarantee that the hydraulic system will be completely free of contaminants.  Solid particulate matter, can and will, remain in valves, pumps, motors and on the internal surfaces of high pressure hoses.  By introducing certain changes that greatly improve filtration system efficiency, equipment downtime can be significantly reduced because the fluid is purified and contaminates can be removed much more effectively than by a simple oil and filter change.

Studies and practical experience indicate that over 70% of hydraulic system failures occur within the hydraulic drive.  In turn, 50% of the hydraulic drive failures occur due to the presence of solid particles in the hydraulic fluid circulating in the system and the drive.  The high percentage of drive failures is due to the fact that hydraulic drive components rapidly wear down when operating with contaminated liquid.  This leads to a reduction of operating efficiency and an increase of internal energy loss.  Operational costs also rise all due to a lack of timely preventive maintenance.

If Serial Filters are used in the hydraulic system, the concentration of solids in the fluid will be approximately 0.022% by weight.  This is 4.4 times above the acceptable standard.  Particles from 10 to 40 micron in size can constitute up to 50% of the contaminants in the fluid.  These sizes mostly coincide with the clearances between friction surfaces and are therefore, the most dangerous and cause the most wear.

As with serial filters, Main Line Filters also cannot provide the required level of hydraulic fluid purification needed to prevent systems failures by themselves.   The hydraulic drive therefore, must be rinsed by special means or processes.

The importance of a thorough cleaning of the hydraulic drives is because of the high level of precision components found in hydraulic systems that are very sensitive to even small amounts of contamination.  As the system becomes larger, the rate of contamination also becomes larger increasing the need for timely preventive maintenance.

If the equipment is operated in dusty environments, particles of dust will settle on cylinder shafts and will enter the hydraulic drive.  A large portion of contaminates and wear products enter the hydraulic tank through the drain lines and cylinder shafts thereby avoiding the filter system.

A excellent way to improve and maintain the purity of hydraulic fluid is through periodic rinsing and removal of harmful particles.  GlobeCore’s UVR Purification Units are specially designed systems aimed at purification of turbine oil, industrial oil, and transformer oil and have a reputation for versatility and reliability.  They have the ability to purify oils and fluids back to their original new like condition and can even exceed well established quality standards.  The UVR plants, due to their compact design and high level of mobility, can be used at your maintenance facility or offsite at remote locations.  There are no restrictions that limit the use of the UVR systems anywhere there is a need for oil purification services.  The compact design allows GlobeCore to ship the UVR units to anywhere in the world.

While cleaning the system, it should be noted that special detergents can only be used in the beginning stages of the process since any detergent remaining is considered an unwanted contaminant.

Prevention of Contamination

Prevention of hydraulic system failures is only possible if enough attention is paid to the most likely cause of the failures.  It is generally accepted that contaminants are the leading cause of system failures. It is therefore, important to use effective methods of controlling and preventing contamination.  Controlling contamination can help to ensure efficient operation of the system, extend the service life of components, and eliminate malfunctions before costly repairs or unplanned down time is required.

Testing

A daily testing of the hydraulic system allows the operator to quickly localize leaks and other malfunctions before they impact operation.  Periodic checks include checking the pressure in the system, visual inspections, and checking fluid level before, during and after the completion of the work cycle.

Inside the Hydraulic System

Prevention of contamination is very important, but it is equally as important to understand the processes occurring inside the hydraulic system. Regular checking of hydraulic fluid is the best way of localizing part wear and contamination.

Regular sampling

In order to precisely estimate the condition of the hydraulic system, regular sampling of the fluid is required and recommended as part of a comprehensive preventive maintenance program.  It is recommended to take an oil sample for analysis every 500 hours of operation or sooner if the equipment is operated in extreme conditions.  If samples are taken regularly, a certain base line may be established and will allow the operator and maintenance manager to immediately see any deviations allowing for timely corrective action.


See more video about transformer oil purification

Influence of Hydraulic Fluid Contamination on Equipment Wear

According to recent industry statistics, 70-80% of hydraulic system malfunctions and up to 90% of bearing failures are caused by media contamination.

Types of Contamination and the Long Term Impact

The performance, quality, and purity of operating fluids directly affect the reliability and the service life of pumps, hydraulic drives and various hydraulic equipment installed in mobile and stationary locations.  If high precision hydraulic equipment is used with gaps between moving parts of 5 to 24 microns, then the use of high quality hydraulic fluid that is free from contaminates is a must to ensure continuous trouble free operation of the system.  The effects of contamination on the performance of equipment will vary and depends on the size and composition of the contamination.

The aggressive effects of fluid contamination is detrimental to the reliability and durability of hydraulic systems.  Undesirable consequences may be caused by solid particles carried by the fluid that enter through the gaps in the system.  Contamination will be found on the surfaces of flat friction pairs, valve facets etc.  This unwanted contamination leads to increased wear and equipment failures that include hydraulic lock, clogging of small valves, plunger jamming, loss of valve tightness and other system failures.

Axial-plunger pumps and the control slides of automatic control systems are especially sensitive to fluid contamination.  Solid particles of comparable sizes to the gaps pose the biggest threat to plunger and slide pairs.

Entry of Contaminants into the Hydraulic Systems

There are five ways contaminants can enter hydraulic system:  (1) Through insufficient and improper cleaning of components and parts during manufacture (metal files, remaining abrasives, fragments of construction material etc;  (2) through the introduction of contaminated fluid when initially filling or refilling the system;  (3) through the introduction of contaminants during assembly and repairs;  (4) through the wear and corrosion of parts during normal operation; and (5) from dust and dirt that enters through vents or loose hydraulic tank plugs.

Particle Size

Despite the fact that Solid Contaminants are extremely small, they can still accelerate the aging of oil, cause rapid wear of components, and cause failure and malfunction of operating assemblies.

Gaps in Typical Hydraulic System Components

In modern hydraulic systems, the gaps between components are limited to the range of 1 to 25 microns.  Lately, as technology and machining processes improve, the gaps have been decreasing raising the fluid quality and purity requirements higher and higher.

Contamination reduces the reliability of hydraulic equipment and accelerates its wear and shortens effective service life.  Hence the reason research into the most efficient ways of purification has been part of the industry for decades.  GlobeCore is a leader in research and development of purification systems that are efficient and protect the environment.

Purification

GlobeCore offers a line of UVR vacuum purification systems that are designed for purification of hydraulic fluid, turbine oil, industrial oil, mineral oil, compressor oil, and transformer oils.  The UVR units are built around a vacuum and adsorbent treatment process.  These systems can also lighten the product appearance and remove paraffins and some sulfur from fuels.

The main advantage of the UVR plants is their economy and versatility (requires no additional adjustments when switching from one product to another since the machine operates in an automatic mode).

GlobeCore is the Industry leader in the manufacture of the highest quality oil purification systems anywhere in the world today.


See more video about transformer oil purification

Hydraulic System Assembly

Hydraulic System Installation Requirements

During the assembly and installation of hydraulic systems, the first concern is to provide easy access to the components and assemblies.  The service replacement of a system component should not require disassembling of neighboring components and hydraulic drive components.  Hydraulic systems should also not bear the weight of connecting pipes.  Additionally, loads caused by elastic deformation are undesirable and lead to future maintenance problems and should be avoided.

Sufficient pressure of hydraulic fluid should be provided in the hydraulic suction line.  The diameter of the suction line should not be less than the mean diameter of the pump’s suction inlet pipe.  The flow rate of the fluid in the suction line should also be limited to approximately 1.2 meters per second.  The resistance should be minimal with pressure in a range of between 0.02 – 0.025 MPa.  The rate of fluid flow in the drain lines of hydraulic drives with open circulation, should not exceed the flow rate in the suction line.  Otherwise, air and oil emulsion will form in the hydraulic tank when being drained.  The drain outlet should be submerged in the oil at a 45 degree angle.  The minimum clearance of the outlet from the bottom of the tank is calculated as twice the diameter of the drain pipe.

To prevent formation of air pockets, the drain outlets of hydraulic machines should be oriented in an upward direction.  If the drain line is long, its cross section should be increased to prevent pressure build up in the machine.

Connections are made by either flexible steel lines or rubber-metal hoses.  The specifications of the lines or hoses should meet the following requirements:

  • the hoses must not hang or kink;
  • sharp bends or twists are not allowed;
  • the hoses must not rub against each other and other components of the machine during operation;
  • the length of a straight part near the connection must be at least six times the external diameter of the hose.

Air removal devices are installed in the topmost point of the pipes.

Assembly and Installation of Hydraulic Machines and Hydraulic Systems

Assembly is begun by testing all components and parts ensuring that all required parts are present and on hand.  The first parts to be assembled are hydraulic assemblies, connection lines and instrumentation.  Control and cooling systems are next in the assembly process.  During assembly, all openings for the entry and exit of hydraulic fluids must be tightly sealed with plugs.  Purification and etching of internal surfaces of the pipes is mandatory.  Following the purification and etching process, the pipes are rinsed in special baths, dried with hot air and plugged until installation.  To ensure pipe integrity and performance at high pressure, they are tested before installation using twice the normal operating pressure.

The correct installation of sealing materials requires additional attention.  Dents, chips and other damage on the surface of parts for connecting and sealing is unacceptable and will lead to fluids leaks.  The size and cleanliness of contacting surfaces must comply with the existing standards and regulations.

Before installing the seals, a lint-free swab, soaked in benzene, is used to treat the seal surfaces and the surfaces they will make contact with.  Next, the surfaces are dried at room temperature until the benzene evaporates.  Only then can the seals and part surfaces be coated with the operating liquid or a lubricating material neutral to the material of the seal.

Seals must not be warped, stretched, twisted or damaged in any way.  If the sealed components do not have bevels, special assembly arbors are used for installation of seals with uneven or step-shaped parts.

Assembly and dis-assembly of positive displacement hydraulic drives must be done in accordance with the operators manual.

Filling of the System with Hydraulic Fluid

Upon completion of assembly, hydraulic fluid will be placed into the equipment.  Special attention must  be paid as to the correct type and correct amount of hydraulic fluid that will be put into the system.  The fluid must not contain water and solid particles must be removed by special filtration equipment prior to filling.

GlobeCore offers the UVR line of equipment for this purpose and it is based on unique and industry leading technology.  The GlobeCore UVR system is equipped with drying and degassing sections. Solved gases and water are removed from the oil by vacuum and the liquid is filtered.  The remaining contaminants are removed by Fuller’s Earth adsorbents.

The advantage of GlobeCore’s equipment is its versatility.  The UVR systems not only process hydraulic oils, they also process transformer oil, turbine oil, industrial oils, diesel fuel, HFO, kerosene, gas condensate and gasoline.

After using the GlobeCore Process of oil purification, the hydraulic oil is fully restored and is made to comply with and/or exceed industry standards.  After using the GlobeCore Process, your company can confidently avoid the cost of repairs and replacement of components that would have most likely failed due contaminated hydraulic fluid.

Filtration fineness cannot  exceed that of the finest filter in the hydraulic system.  Hydraulic fluid is filled into the system at special filling stations equipped with manual or mechanical drives.  The use of such stations have several obvious advantages.  (1) Availability of a tank protecting the oil from contamination during transportation, storage and filling;  and (2)  input and output fine filters providing the required fineness of filtration.

Filling of a positive displacement hydraulic system can be roughly divided into three stages: (1) The first stage is to fill the oil into the hydraulic system and remove air through the drain system.  The fluid is fed through the assembly line and into the lower drain point of the hydraulic drive.  As liquid enters the system, air is pushed out into the hydraulic tank through the top drain point;  (2) The hydraulic tank is filled to the top level; and (3) the hydraulic system is then topped off with fluid.

After completion of the these three stages, the positive displacement hydraulic drive is tested at idle with minimal rotation speed of the drive shaft.  The tests are repeated every 15 seconds. Hydraulic system filling is controlled by the rate of decrease in the hydraulic tank fluid level.  When the tank is filled, the drive motor is starts to operate at idle speed.  It operates at this speed for 3 to 5 minutes.  The system is then filled with liquid to the required level usually indicated by the mark on the hydraulic tank indicator.

After Assembly; The Rinsing of Pipes with Operating Fluid

[:en]The purging of hydraulic system pipes is vitally important to the proper operation of your hydraulic system equipment.  Purging the pipes ensures that the hydraulic system will have trouble free operation for the duration of its normal service life.  If the purge is not performed, or the duration of the process is not sufficient, premature wear of the internal components will be accelerated.  The system will most likely malfunction and/or fail entirely.  Problems may even occur immediately after being placed into service.

Our company, GlobeCore offers unique equipment that can purify turbine oil, industrial oil, transformer oil and other industrial oils.  Purity of the liquid after treatment in one of the GlobeCore UVR plants complies with and usually exceeds all existing standards.  The GlobeCore Process will help prevent hydraulic systems from failing prematurely and will greatly help to increase the service life of the treated equipment.
In accordance with industry standards, the following positive results can be achieved after purifying hydraulic equipment by removing solid particles, moisture, and other harmful contaminates from the hydraulic fluid:

  1. Double the lifetime of hydraulic motors, valves, pumps and distribution devices
  2. Hydraulic system warranties can be extended by as much as two years due to the reduction in the risk of hydraulic system component failure during the warranty period.  Fluid purity however, must still be monitored and controlled and the hydraulic system must be cleaned annually.
  3. Reduction of equipment downtime for repairs.
  4. Elimination of the cost of transportation of equipment to repair sites.
  5. Reduction of downtime costs.

It should be noted that the common concept that changing the oil and filters removes all moisture and contamination from the hydraulic equipment is simply not true.  Contamination remains in the motors, valves and on the internal surface of high pressure hoses.  Changing the oil is certainly an improvement, but it is an incomplete process that is costly, inefficient and will require repeating more frequently than a true purification process.

With slight modification of the filtration system and the use of special filter elements, equipment down time costs can be reduced significantly.

Recent studies and experience shows that no less than 70% of hydraulic failures occur due to the presence of solid particulate matter in the hydraulic fluid.  This failure rate is even more alarming considering that over 50% of all failures occur in the hydraulic drive system.  If equipment is allowed to operate with contaminated liquid, it will lead to intensive and premature wear of the hydraulic drive components, reduction of efficiency and increased internal energy losses.   The consequences are lost time and increased operating costs.

If Serial Filters are used in the hydraulic system, the concentration of solids in the fluid will be approximately 0.022% by weight.  This is 4.4 times above the acceptable standard.  Particles from 10 to 40 micron in size can constitute up to 50% of the contaminants in the fluid.  These sizes mostly coincide with the clearances between friction surfaces and are therefore, the most dangerous and cause the most wear.

As with serial filters, Main Line Filters also cannot provide the required level of hydraulic fluid purification needed to prevent system failures by themselves.   The hydraulic drive therefore, must be rinsed by special means or processes.

The main method of liquid purification in operating hydraulic equipment is regular purification of the hydraulic fluid by GlobeCore’s UVR plants.

It should be considered that purging of pipelines with special detergents is only sensible at the very first stages. At the time of system assembly and commissioning, the system should be purged with the hydraulic fluid, since using a detergent may lead to additional contamination of the system.


See more video about transformer oil purification

[:de]The purging of hydraulic system pipes is vitally important to the proper operation of your hydraulic system equipment.  Purging the pipes ensures that the hydraulic system will have trouble free operation for the duration of its normal service life.  If the purge is not performed, or the duration of the process is not sufficient, premature wear of the internal components will be accelerated.  The system will most likely malfunction and/or fail entirely.  Problems may even occur immediately after being placed into service.

Our company, GlobeCore offers unique equipment that can purify turbine oil, industrial oil, transformer oil and other industrial oils.  Purity of the liquid after treatment in one of the GlobeCore UVR plants complies with and usually exceeds all existing standards.  The GlobeCore Process will help prevent hydraulic systems from failing prematurely and will greatly help to increase the service life of the treated equipment.
In accordance with industry standards, the following positive results can be achieved after purifying hydraulic equipment by removing solid particles, moisture, and other harmful contaminates from the hydraulic fluid:

  1. Double the lifetime of hydraulic motors, valves, pumps and distribution devices
  2. Hydraulic system warranties can be extended by as much as two years due to the reduction in the risk of hydraulic system component failure during the warranty period.  Fluid purity however, must still be monitored and controlled and the hydraulic system must be cleaned annually.
  3. Reduction of equipment downtime for repairs.
  4. Elimination of the cost of transportation of equipment to repair sites.
  5. Reduction of downtime costs.

It should be noted that the common concept that changing the oil and filters removes all moisture and contamination from the hydraulic equipment is simply not true.  Contamination remains in the motors, valves and on the internal surface of high pressure hoses.  Changing the oil is certainly an improvement, but it is an incomplete process that is costly, inefficient and will require repeating more frequently than a true purification process.

With slight modification of the filtration system and the use of special filter elements, equipment down time costs can be reduced significantly.

Recent studies and experience shows that no less than 70% of hydraulic failures occur due to the presence of solid particulate matter in the hydraulic fluid.  This failure rate is even more alarming considering that over 50% of all failures occur in the hydraulic drive system.  If equipment is allowed to operate with contaminated liquid, it will lead to intensive and premature wear of the hydraulic drive components, reduction of efficiency and increased internal energy losses.   The consequences are lost time and increased operating costs.

If Serial Filters are used in the hydraulic system, the concentration of solids in the fluid will be approximately 0.022% by weight.  This is 4.4 times above the acceptable standard.  Particles from 10 to 40 micron in size can constitute up to 50% of the contaminants in the fluid.  These sizes mostly coincide with the clearances between friction surfaces and are therefore, the most dangerous and cause the most wear.

As with serial filters, Main Line Filters also cannot provide the required level of hydraulic fluid purification needed to prevent system failures by themselves.   The hydraulic drive therefore, must be rinsed by special means or processes.

The main method of liquid purification in operating hydraulic equipment is regular purification of the hydraulic fluid by GlobeCore’s UVR plants.

It should be considered that purging of pipelines with special detergents is only sensible at the very first stages. At the time of system assembly and commissioning, the system should be purged with the hydraulic fluid, since using a detergent may lead to additional contamination of the system.


See more video about transformer oil purification
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Purification of Hydraulic Fluid used in Excavator Equipment

Excavator hydraulic systems are powered by hydraulic fluids derived from mineral oils.  Hydraulic fluids operate at constant pressure created by one or more pumps known as “hydraulic prime movers.” This pumping action causes the transfer of energy to actuators, hydraulic motors and hydraulic cylinders.  Besides transferring motion to various parts, the fluids also serve to lubricate friction parts and prevent corrosion.

Since mineral oil must freely pass through hydraulic lines, hydraulic system channels and high pressure hoses, it should be able to maintain the proper viscosity at a range of operating temperatures.  It should also retain its performance characteristics with temperature deviations found in extreme cold and extreme heat climates and with temperature variations that come with the change of seasons.

Another important characteristic of hydraulic fluid is its ability to resist the affects of oxidation and remain stable against chemical reactions with hydraulic system construction materials (bronze, steel, rubber, plastic etc), as well as with other dynamic parameters both in storage and operation.

Manufacturers offer many types of hydraulic fluids for use in various climates and make recommendations on which fluid is best for a particular climate and equipment type.

The above requirements for operating fluids must be observed in the operation and maintenance of your of equipment.  The hydraulic system in any piece of equipment must be able to maintain air tightness to avoid the entry of moisture, dust and other contaminants that will rapidly degrade the quality of the fluids and damage internal parts.

Hydraulic fluids are usually delivered in special barrels or by oil-carrier trucks.  Reputable manufacturers normally guarantee the quality of fresh and unused oils, but it is still in your best interest to test the oils and fluids before use to ensure its absence of contaminates and to ensure that it meets the requirements of your equipment.  Testing is initiated by taking samples of the fluid and performing an analysis.  If the testing and analysis reveal that the oil or fluid does not measure up to the quality standard, or contains unacceptable levels of contaminates, the oil should either be replaced or cleaned.  The manufacturer has a responsibility to provide you with a clean and high quality oil or fluid, but cleaning the oil through an in-house purification process may actually save you time and money over sending the oil back.

GlobeCore has a solution for your company.  GlobeCore’s UVR equipment line of purification units offer high quality purification of mineral oils that comply with the highest quality standards of new oil.  The GlobeCore Regeneration Process restores the oil to new like condition and improves the oil making it more stable and resistant to oxidation.   The GlobeCore Process will ensure the highest efficiency of your excavator equipment during operation and will help to eliminate the costs of unscheduled repairs and component replacement caused by hydraulic fluid contamination.

Fluid and Oil Contamination Problems

The idea that storage of oils and fluids in a clean warehouse will prevent contamination from entering your hydraulic equipment is a dangerous misconception.  Oils and fluids may become contaminated during the filling process or during transportation that may or may not be due to the negligence or incompetence of service personnel.  Oil carrier tanks must also be checked regularly and cleaned of dirt, dust and water, but ultimately you are the one that must ensure uncontaminated oil or fluid is not being placed in our equipment.

Water may enter the oil when filling the hydraulic oil tank when it is raining at the fill location.  Water is a major enemy of hydraulic systems because of the corrosion it creates in the internal parts of the hydraulic system.  Corrosion from water results in contamination of the fluid and changes the composition of the fluid leading to internal damage and performance problems.  For example, the internal surfaces of hydraulic cylinders may form blisters or scratches and may lead to internal leaking of fluids.  This will cause the excavator to lose tension and droop when un-powered.

The first source of contamination is usually created by, and is introduced into the hydraulic system during the manufacturing process.  Slag, metal filings, rubber crumbs, and other manufacturing waste and by-products can all enter the system during the manufacturing process.  These unwanted particles may vary in size from only 3 to 5 microns, but still pose problems for sensitive internal parts of the hydraulic system.  Obviously, the better the production process, the less debris that will enter the hydraulic system.  Less debris will help to reduce the negative impact on the clearances between moving friction parts.

Contaminants may also form during the course of the natural wear process of hydraulic system components.  Normally these contaminates will be removed by special filters, but once those filters become saturated they will require timely replacement.  If the filters are not replaced, contaminates will continue to circulate causing internal damage to your hydraulic system.  Besides visual inspections, many manufacturers now include special sensors that indicate filter contamination levels alerting the operators that it is time to replace the filters.

Oil and Fluid Replacement Intervals

Replacing operating liquids based on time, miles/kilometers, or hours was at one time the only real way to manage your equipment preventive maintenance program.  Replacement of fluids based on the operating time of the excavator is no longer necessary from an economic and labor cost viewpoint.   With time and distance based change intervals, the actual condition of the fluid was not taken into  consideration.

Today, Oil Sampling and Analysis Programs are far better at monitoring fluids and oils and telling us the proper time to replace or regenerate the oils rather than using time and distance only parameters.  Oil analysis, along with timely filter replacement will prevent the contaminates from circulating in your equipment’s hydraulic system.  Magnets placed on filters, drain plugs, and in fluid reservoirs can also reduce the amount of metal contaminates from circulating and causing damage in the hydraulic system.

Danger of Non-Organic Contaminates

Non-organic particles, such as quartz, feldspar, aluminum oxides, and iron pose the greatest amount of danger to the hydraulic drive system.  The main danger is that the hardness of these highly damaging particles is higher than that of the hydraulic system parts.

These harmful contaminants enter the gaps between the moving friction parts suspended in the fluid.  They disrupt the oil film and tear the surface of the components with their edges like a piece of course sandpaper.  The time it takes before wear becomes a problem depends on the amount of contamination in the fluid, but unless they are removed or prevented from entering the hydraulic system, they will cause damage.  If the size of the particles are between 5 and 45 microns, the pumping assemblies and the spool may further pulverize them causing accelerated component wear.  For instance, before operation, the correct radial gap in precision pairs of distribution valves is between 6 and 8 microns.  Due to contaminate based wear, the radial gap may grow to as much as between 32 and 46 microns reducing performance and causing long term damage problems.

Preventing Contamination from Entering Hydraulic Fluid Reservoirs

Contamination of oil also occurs when oil comes in contact with dusty air when the fluid is poured into the hydraulic tank or when transported in open containers.  Airborne dust may also enter the fluid through loose connections of hydraulic system pressure lines and hoses.

The question you may be asking is; Can dust, dirt, and water be excluded from entering the hydraulic system when it is filled?  The answer is yes.  Since oil is lighter than water, the water will settle below the oil.  If at all present, water and other settled contamination will be found at the bottom of the oil container holding the oil you want to introduce into the hydraulic equipment.  The oil may be put into the hydraulic tank by placing the end of a suction line into the oil container which effectively eliminates any mixing of oil and outside air.  The hose must not however, be lowered to the bottom of the container where it may transfer water, moisture, and other contaminates into your hydraulic equipment fluid reservoir.

Of course, the hydraulic system should not be filled with a bucket or other open containers, but with special filling equipment similar to the kind that is used at gas stations.

The best way to handle the transfer of oil is with the “refinery – oil truck – hydraulic tank.”  In order to prevent contaminants from entering the hydraulic equipment’s fluid reservoir however, the oil from the refinery should be clean.  It should also be passed through a “special 4 micron filter” as it is being pumped from the truck’s oil container into the equipment’s hydraulic fluid reservoir tank.

Importance of Monitoring Filter Service Life and Fluid Service Life

Engineers always look for ways to increase filtration fineness which in some cases may lead to filter clogging and buildup of back pressure tripping the safety valve.  When that happens, fluid will by-pass the filter and unfiltered fluid will be circulated through the hydraulic system.  Do not try solve this issue by increasing the safety valve pressure parameter.  It will only serve to increase the load on the hydraulic pump and could possibly result in premature pump failure.  The best solution is to replace filters on a timely basis and to employ the GlobeCore Process as part of your ongoing preventive maintenance program.  The GlobeCore Process eliminates contaminated oil and fluid problems before they cause damage to your valuable hydraulic system equipment.

Its time to get with the Process, The GlobeCore Process!

See more video about transformer oil purification